Kinder Scout
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No.503617
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Lectures

Last updated 01.02.2017

Non Members are welcome

Date Speaker Subject (click for info)
15th Oct 2016
6.00 pm
Noel Worley
12th Nov 2016
6.00 pm
Dr Nick Longrich,
University of Bath
10th Dec 2016
6.00 pm
Dr Tom Dijkstra
Loughborough Uni & BGS
14th Jan 2017
6.00 pm
Andrew Bloodworth,
BGS
11th Feb 2017
6.00pm
Vanessa Banks,
BGS
11th Mar 2017
6.00 pm
Dr Adam Smith, Nottingham Natural History Museum
8th Apr 2017
6.00 pm
Dr Julie Prytulak, Imperial College, London

Venue - Please note the change to previous years!
Meetings will be held in future in the Geography Department of Nottingham University, which is in the Sir Clive Granger Building. Enter the university by the North Entrance, off the A52, and follow signs to the Main Visitor Car Park. As you turn right into the car park, the Sir Clive Granger Building is on your left [Nottingham University Map]

 
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EMGS INDOOR LECTURE PROGRAMME

Titles:
Mineralisation of the South Pennine Orefield
Date:
15th October 2016
Speaker:
Noel Worley
Abstract:

Mineralization in the South Pennine Orefield is of the Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) and is concentrated within an area of some 200 km2, mainly along the eastern margins of a large inlier, the Derbyshire High, in Carboniferous platform carbonate host rocks.  The inlier forms an up-dip promontory of a larger structure, the East Midlands Shelf, and is surrounded by shales and sandstones of the Millstone Grit and Pennine Coal Measures groups.  Mineralization probably began during the late Westphalian (Moscovian, Mid Pennsylvanian), when subsidence due to thermal sag resulted in the limestone being buried to depths of ~4 km beneath younger strata.  A palaeohydraulic reconstruction is described based on analysis of mineralized palaeokarst features, which are interpreted as representing hypogenic or deep-seated karst formed by the interstratal circulation of hydrothermal water in a mostly confined hydrodynamic setting.  Variscan inversion of N–S faults to the east of the SPO resulted in erosion of Namurian and Westphalian (Upper Mississippian–Middle Pennsylvanian) rocks and created a hydraulic gradient inclined towards the south-west.  Acidic F-Ba-Pb-Zn enriched fluid evolved in the Namurian basinal rocks and migrated into fractured limestone.  The resultant wall-rock dissolution along existing wrench faults led to the formation of a maze of stratiform mineral deposits (flats) and more irregular spongework-shaped structures (pipes).  The presence of hydrocarbon accumulations in the limestones and evidence from fluid inclusions indicates that the mineralizing fluids were chloride/fluoride-rich and compositionally typical of oilfield brine.  Isotope evidence demonstrates a sulphate evaporite source of sulphur, mainly from the Chadian (Visean, Middle Mississippian) Middleton Anhydrite Formation.  By the late Cenozoic, karstification of exposed carbonate rocks began and the current pattern of epigenic karst drainage started to develop as the regional hydraulic gradient reversed, assuming its present eastward inclined attitude.  The mineralized hypogenic karst was overprinted by later drainage systems as the hydraulic gradient changed, and placer deposits were formed from the erosion of existing mineralization.  This was accompanied by circulation of meteoric water and resulted in the supergene weathering of the sulphide ore minerals.  Eastward underflow of meteoric groundwater also exploited the same mineralization flow paths.

Reference:
Ford, T.D. & Worley, N.E. 2016. Mineralization of the South Pennine Orefield, UK – A Review. Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society. 61, 55-86.

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Title:
Giant marine reptiles & whales during the Eocene-Oligocene cooling event
Date:
12th November 2016
Speaker:
Dr Nick Longrich, University of Bath
Abstract:

The early Cenozoic supported a remarkably diverse fauna of marine reptiles, including marine snakes, crocodilians, and turtles. Little is known about how and when this fauna became extinct, and whether the extinctions were driven by environmental changes, competition, or a combination of the two. A review of fossils from the Late Eocene of North Africa suggests that a diverse fauna of marine reptiles survived alongside early whales and sea cows and then disappeared near the Eocene-Oligocene (E-O) boundary. The fauna contains two families of giant sea snakes, two families of marine crocodilians, and three families of marine turtles. Most of these families are not known to survive beyond the E-O event. However, the groups that disappeared at this time were already in decline for millions of years before the extinction. These patterns suggest a complex pattern of extinction driven by climate change. Slow cooling over the course of the Eocene slowly reduced the diversity of marine reptiles and may have given warm-blooded whales a competitive advantage. This gradual decline made marine reptiles vulnerable to a sudden environmental shift at the E-O boundary, driven by severe global cooling and a productivity collapse associated with the onset of Antarctic glaciation. After the E-O event the world transitioned to an icehouse climate regime, and new marine radiations were primarily driven by mammals and birds, which suggests that cooler oceans favored warm blooded animals. These patterns suggest that climate change- particularly rapid climate change, and particularly cooling- played a central role in restructuring marine ecosystems and the evolution of the modern marine fauna.

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Title:
Geohazards in Central China; landslides in loess and the 2010 Zhouqu debris flow disaster
Date:
10th December 2016
Speaker:
Dr Tom Dijkstra, Loughborough University & British Geological Survey
Abstract:

China is all too often in the news as a result of geohazards that have a severe impact on lives and livelihoods. The mountainous terrain of Central China is subject to frequent hazards of high intensity such as the 2010 Zhouqu debris flow that destroyed more than 200 buildings and killed more than 1500 people. Rapid economic development brings with it expansion of urban centres and infrastructure networks, which not only increases the exposure of the population to natural processes in a dynamic environment, but can also lead to further strains on a landscape that is only marginally stable.

Frequent geohazard events have sparked much research in an effort to better understand processes and material properties that can be used to inform and implement effective strategies to mitigate against the negative consequences of these geohazards. Owing to their location along the eastern margins of the Tibetan Plateau the provinces of Gansu, Sichuan and Yunnan are particularly affected by geohazards. This tectonically active region is strongly affected by continuing uplift and, towards the east and NE, crustal stress release has resulted in the formation of some very large systems of NNE–SSW- and WNW–ESE-trending strike-slip and thrust fault zones. Differences in relative uplift and displacement along these faults have had a significant impact on the present physiography of Central China. Several important geohazard regions can be distinguished and in this presentation geohazard issues will be highlighted for two regions: landslides in the loess plateau of the Lanzhou region and the debris flows in mountainous fringes along the north-eastern and eastern margins of the Tibetan Plateau.

(to be followed by our Christmas cheese and wine evening)

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Title: The secret life of your mobile phone: metal supply and digital devices
Date: 14th January 2017
Speaker: Andrew Bloodworth, British Geological Survey
Abstract:

Up until the mid-20th Century very few metallic elements in the Periodic Table had any practical use. Since then mankind has broadened its pallet of useful metals enormously to take in so-called 'rare' or 'critical' or 'exotic' or 'technology' materials, including rare earth elements, platinum group elements and others, from beryllium to zirconium. This expansion has been pulled along by the development of new digital technologies and their almost magical appeal to billions of consumers across the globe.

This talk uses the ubiquitous mobile phone to illustrate the importance of these metals and to explore issues around supply security and 'criticality'. This will include a look at ideas related to metal supply from geological and other sources and may challenge some commonly held assumptions relating to non-renewable mineral resources and physical scarcity. It will also look at the human factors that influence metal availability and the environmental limits to our conspicuous consumption of these vital raw materials

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Title: Hydrogeology of the Peak District
Date: 11th February 2017
Speaker: Vanessa Banks, BGS
Abstract:

Groundwater systems can be thought of in terms of catchments that incorporate recharge, throughflow and discharge. This approach can be applied at a range of scales, i.e. local, intermediate and regional flow systems. This presentation will consider the underpinning geological factors in these models and assess their relevance to River Basin Management Planning and of the value of the water resources in the Peak District for supply, leisure and ecosystem services.

To be followed by our Annual Dinner (see Circular for menu)

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Title: Swimming Plesiosaurs and flying dinosaurs vertebrate palaeontology at Wollaton Hall
Date: 11th March 2017
Speaker: Dr Adam Smith,  Nottingham Natural History Museum
Abstract:

TBC

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Title: The Biggest Volcano on Earth
Date: 8th April 2017
Speaker: Dr Julie Prytulak, Imperial College, London
Abstract:

What images are evoked with the phrase ‘super-volcano’? Large explosions? Catastrophic damage? Perhaps even the extinction of species?  Many television programs preach the devastating effects of an eruption of the Yellowstone ‘supervolcano’.  In this talk I will guide you through the discovery and critical importance of the Earth’s largest volcano (and it’s not Yellowstone…).  It is in a rather unfamiliar location and its discovery required years of concerted effort from a group of scientists from diverse backgrounds.  It has, and continues to yield invaluable information about the deep interior of the Earth.

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